International Journal of Critical Illness and Injury Science

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2021  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 223--228

Perioperative colloid choice and bleeding in patients undergoing musculoskeletal surgery: An observational administrative database study


Vijay Krishnamoorthy1, Calvin O Motika2, Tetsu Ohnuma1, Duncan McLean3, Alan R Ellis4, Karthik Raghunathan1 
1 Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center; Critical Care and Perioperative Population Health Research Unit, Duke University, Durham, NC, USA
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA
3 Department of Anesthesiology, The University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA
4 School of Social Work, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Vijay Krishnamoorthy
Department of Anesthesiology, Duke University Medical Center, 2301 Erwin Road, Durham, NC 27710
USA

Background: The synthetic colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES) received a black box warning, issued by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in June 2013, in patients with sepsis, due to increased risk of bleeding, renal injury, and death. Risks of HES in populations undergoing noncardiac surgery are unclear. Here, we examine the association of colloid choice – human-derived albumin versus HES – with bleeding in musculoskeletal surgery. Methods: Inpatient musculoskeletal surgical patients who received colloids on the day of surgery were included during a time period before the FDA warning on HES using the Premier Healthcare database. The exposure was type of colloids administered on the day of surgery: HES versus albumin. The primary outcome was major perioperative bleeding, measured on the 1st postoperative day through hospital discharge. The secondary outcomes included acute renal failure and postoperative length of stay >75th percentile. Results: We identified 41,211 patients who received albumin (n = 12,803) and HES (n = 28,408) on the day of surgery. The propensity-weighted multivariable analysis demonstrated a reduced risk of major perioperative bleeding on the day after surgery following treatment with albumin versus HES (relative risk: 0.89 [95% confidence interval, 0.84–0.93]). No significant differences were observed in the secondary outcomes. Conclusion: When compared with albumin, treatment with HES on the day of musculoskeletal surgery was associated with an increased risk of major perioperative bleeding on subsequent days. Given that HES continues to be used as a colloid in multiple patient populations worldwide, further studies examining the safety of HES versus albumin solutions are needed.


How to cite this article:
Krishnamoorthy V, Motika CO, Ohnuma T, McLean D, Ellis AR, Raghunathan K. Perioperative colloid choice and bleeding in patients undergoing musculoskeletal surgery: An observational administrative database study.Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci 2021;11:223-228


How to cite this URL:
Krishnamoorthy V, Motika CO, Ohnuma T, McLean D, Ellis AR, Raghunathan K. Perioperative colloid choice and bleeding in patients undergoing musculoskeletal surgery: An observational administrative database study. Int J Crit Illn Inj Sci [serial online] 2021 [cited 2022 May 22 ];11:223-228
Available from: https://www.ijciis.org/article.asp?issn=2229-5151;year=2021;volume=11;issue=4;spage=223;epage=228;aulast=Krishnamoorthy;type=0