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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16-20

Spectrum and outcome of traumatic brain injury in children <15 years: A tertiary level experience in India


1 Department of Neurosurgery, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India
2 Department of Transfusion Medicine, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Mani Charan Satapathy
Department of Neurosurgery, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack - 753 001, Odisha
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2229-5151.177359

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Background: Though, traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been documented as the single most common cause of morbidity and mortality in infancy and childhood, the exact incidence is unavailable in India. Moreover, modes of injury, mechanisms of damage, and management differ significantly from that of an adult. Aims and Objectives: To analyze the epidemiological factors, the spectrum of TBI, modes of injury, types of injury, and the outcome in the children <15 years with TBI. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study from August 2012 to May 2013 at Department of Neurosurgery, S.C.B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India. All the pertinent details from case records of hundred and forty-seven children <15 years with TBI were analyzed. Follow-up was done for 6 months at outpatients department. Results: Age wise, incidence and severity of TBI is more common in 10–15 years. Males outnumber females with a male: female ratio 2.19:1. Overall, road traffic accident (RTA) is the commonest mode of injury. Assault is not uncommon (7.48% cases). Falls is common in <5 years while RTA is common in 5–15 years. The extradural hematoma was the most common injury pattern; however, surgical consideration was maximal for fracture skull. Overall mortality was 7.48%. Diffuse axonal injury has the maximum individual potential for mortality. We noticed excellent recovery in 68.7%, disabilities in 17.68%, and persistent vegetative state in 5.45% cases. Conclusion: TBI in children carries good outcome, if resuscitated and referred early to a neurotrauma center, and managed subsequently on an individualized basis with a well-organized team approach. Severe TBI in children has a poor outcome.


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